Goal Setting

Post Marathon Depression

image

This past summer I had the opportunity to be an assistant coach for a group of people who were training for the Fox Cities Full and Half Marathon. They were a highly motivated and fun group. With the exception of a few injuries that were not able to be overcome, most of our runners met their goals.

Shortly after the event, we received a message from one of our participants who said she was having trouble getting motivated to run again. She was concerned there was something wrong with her. Having run many marathons and feeling this many times, I knew what she was talking about. In fact, I am currently having these feelings again as I finish my last month of training for my Karate Black Belt.

I confidently assured her this was a normal reaction. It is kind of like a depression that often happens to a person who puts a lot of effort into one culminating event. My response was simple and appreciated by this person. However, the head coach, Eddie Holzem (2:19 marathon runner), was able to poetically put our participant’s feelings into proper perspective.

Eddie said it best with his response:
“Marathon blues (it’s not from running) – it’s the result of all the work and focus of many months’ worth of physical training and emotional investment – then the next day it’s all over. Kind of depressing. Trying to force a rebound is a mistake too many people make. It takes the bad days to make us really appreciate the good. You are the first person in my 4 years of leading this group to bring up this topic – I am very proud of you because this reveals to me just how invested you were in the achievement of your goals. How lucky you are as an athlete to be able to experience the highs of great training days, the struggles of competition and the emotional depth of what it means to have poured yourself into the journey. It may not seem like it, but this is the reason why people come back for more – you have truly given yourself a gift. This is what it’s all about!”

Basically preparing for a marathon is a major life event. You invest months of time and energy into this one day which is full of pomp and circumstance. However this investment isn’t only of time and energy but also of emotion, which becomes magnified with every obstacle you have to overcome, and typically there will be obstacles. You put a lot into the event. You visualize race day. Race morning of is full of nervous excitement and anticipation. You run the event. You may struggle and hurt but you overcome and cross the finish line. Then all of this comes to an abrupt end. Your schedule is now normal again, but you feel something is missing.

As Eddie said, “You pour yourself into the journey. It may not seem like it, but this is the reason why people come back for more-you have truly given yourself a gift. This is what it’s all about!”

Advertisements

A Metaphor For Life

image

This weekend I ran my first Tough Mudder. I found it to be one of most impactful events I have ever experienced. During some of the more grueling parts of the event I couldn’t help but think how much this challenge paralleled life itself. Even though this event was very moving, this experience is not to be confused with the most significant events of my life, such as my marriage to my wife, Carrie, and the birth of my children.

The challenge started with some pomp and circumstance and we were off, full of excitement and anticipation. We were treated to a beautiful jog along a meandering path. Why not, life can be beautiful. We joked and chatted. There was talk of the obstacles ahead, but the concern was minor. I mean, at this point, like life’s struggles, these obstacles were not real because we had not yet encountered them.

Soon the first obstacle was upon us. We crawled through cold mud under barbed wire. Everyone came out successfully. We continued on our way. But I noticed the bounce had left everyone’s stride. Running with mud filled shoes and wet heavy clothes can be difficult. It was like going through life with an added burden. Participants started to understand it was going to be a long day.

The next obstacle was a little more interesting. It was a wall that slanted backward. The only way to overcome this one was with the help of friends and strangers. Our team was still together. With a little help from our friends we all overcame this challenge fairly easily. We gave each other high fives. Success comes easily with the support of friends. The celebration of friends overcoming life’s challenges can be energizing.

The obstacles and the miles kept coming at us. Individuals started wearing down. Friends separated. The support and kind words of strangers became important. Each person’s response to the stresses was different. We were in this together. If one person faltered, another was there to help them along. The reason the human race is able to move forward is often by the kindness of strangers.

So why is the Tough Mudder a metaphor for life? As I approached each obstacle, the first thought I had was that I wouldn’t be able to overcome this. To overcome obstacles in life, you must cancel out those negative thoughts and develop strategies that will lead to success. I spent most of my summer training for this event. I had to trust my training and change my self talk. I traded, “I am not young anymore” with “Age is a mindset. I am strong enough.” I looked for ways to be successful. I immediately came up with a plan of attack. If needed, I asked for help. With each success, I gained confidence. I grew stronger.

When I finished the event I started thinking about my past. As I replayed my life’s movie, I remembered obstacles that I thought I would never overcome. When I look at myself now, I see an individual made strong by life’s trials. Life is a “Tough Mudder.”

Life will keep coming at you like the climbs and descents of this challenge. Life doesn’t have to defeat you. There will always be obstacles. Be as prepared as you can. If needed, reach out to your friends and to strangers. Know that when you come through the challenge you will be stronger.

In life you never know what is going to happen, however, you do know that something will happen. Your car will break down. You will get sick. Since there really is no way to prepare for what you don’t know, you have to believe in yourself. You have to have a positive mind set. You have to have grit. For this challenge I had to ignore the demons who whispered that I would fail. Obstacles aren’t there to destroy you. Obstacles strengthen you.

In closing I am going to get real. By sharing my experience, I hope to be able to motivate others to overcome obstacles and to reach their goals. However, if you are really looking for inspiration, talk to a cancer survivor or listen to stories of D-Day and the invasion of Normandy. Have your dad or grandpa tell you what it was like trudging through chest high water in the jungles of Vietnam. Ask these people how they overcame these obstacles. Those experiences are not just metaphors for life. That is life. Experiences like those reduce one of my most impactful, moving experiences to nothing more than crawling through mud and playing on Monkey Bars.

Four Exercises That Will Eliminate Cellulite

image

That title was on an article my wife saw on a website. She came in and asked me about their claim which was, if you do these four simple exercises you can get rid of your cellulite. She asked me about it because she usually trusts the site, but because of the claim and her knowledge of fitness, she was skeptical. After our conversation I thought it might be a good idea to address this issue mostly because cellulite has become big business with some unscrupulous people and companies preying off the desperation of others.

So the question is, can the four exercises in the picture get rid of cellulite? Before I answer that, I want to make something clear. Having cellulite does not mean your are overweight. Some factors that influence how much cellulite you have and how visible it is include:

  • Poor diet
  • Fad dieting
  • Slow metabolism
  • Lack of physical activity
  • Hormone changes
  • Dehydration
  • Total body fat
  • Thickness and color of your skin

So what is cellulite? Cellulite is nothing more than normal fat beneath the skin. The fat appears bumpy because it pushes against connective tissue, causing the skin above it to pucker.

Can the four exercises illustrated above get rid of the cellulite in those targeted areas? Even though the illustrated exercises are very good exercises, they most likely won’t reduce cellulite in those targeted areas. You cannot target body fat loss. The exercises will be successful in strengthening and toning the muscles in the targeted areas. Strengthening and toning the muscles may help get rid of overall body fat because exercising can help reduce subcutaneous fat in the body by increasing your metabolism.

So the good news is exercising, including the illustrated exercises, could possibly reduce your cellulite by decreasing the amount of subcutaneous fat in your body. The exercises also increase blood flow to that area, which may increase the production of collagen giving the skin strength and structure. Other options that can help include eating a healthy nutrient rich diet. A job where you sit can increase cellulite, so standing up and moving around can help because sitting can add to a loss of skin elasticity and blood flow which is a major contributor to cellulite. Drinking more water can also be beneficial because it enhances the body’s ability to burn fat and promotes the production of collagen which strengthens the skin’s structure.

The truth is, there are a lot of gimmicks and products that claim to get rid of cellulite. Some may temporarily tighten the skin, but there is no magic cure so don’t waste your money. Eat healthy, exercise regularly and stay hydrated. You will feel better and yes, you will look better.

Why Raise The Bar

Raising The Bar

Why Raise the bar? If you think about it, anytime you perform an activity (achieve a goal) you put forth the minimal amount of effort to complete that activity (achieve that goal) as illustrated in the above image. In the illustration it is clear I would not have cleared the highest bar with the effort I used to clear the lowest bar. Your goal usually is to achieve that goal with minimal effort. This really isn’t a problem and it makes perfect sense.

So why raise the bar? Raising the bar will motivate you to achieve more than you currently are achieving. I remember an episode of the sitcom Taxi where Jim Ignatowski, played by Christopher Lloyd, remembered that someone once told him it doesn’t matter what you do in life as long as you’re the best at it as you can be. Jim Ignatowski went on to provide services above and beyond the minimal services of a New York City taxi driver. The results were amazing tips.

So how does this apply to your health and fitness? To achieve better health and fitness you set goals. If your ultimate goal is to run a 5 K, or lose weight you start with a low bar such as running a block or losing 1.5 to 2 pounds the first week, which is the recommended weekly weight loss. You then come up with a plan that systematically raises the bar. Each time you get over one bar, you raise that bar. But set achievable early goals. Success is important.

As you continue to raise the bar remember, each time you raise the bar, it will require more effort to get over the new bar. If you set each bar just a little higher, success is achievable. Each time you get over the bar, you will have new confidence. If you knock the bar off, don’t give up. Success often come after putting the bar back up and trying again. Think about why you knocked the bar off and learn. Getting over the next bar may require help. Don’t be afraid to seek out the appropriate resources. Following these steps will bring results and success.

So you have gotten over that last bar of your goal. Now what? We need to continue to find new bars. They may be a different bar, but we need to have challenges. Our body needs to be active to maintain our strength or become stronger. If we don’t stay active, our muscles will atrophy, we will lose strength or we will gain back that weight.

As humans we have to have challenges to grow. After I turned fifty I decided I needed a new bar. I enrolled in Karate. It has been a challenge and at times I have wondered if I will be able to achieve my Blackbelt status. However, when I started, even though becoming a Blackbelt was my ultimate bar, that was not my first bar. My first bar was to fulfill the requirements needed to receive my Yellowbelt status. Next I worked towards and achieved my Orangebelt status. Well, you get the picture. I am now roughly two months away from my Blackbelt test. I am confident that getting over the earlier bars have prepared me for this bar. I am excited about getting over this bar. In fact after two months I will be looking for a new bar. Suggestions?

One last thought. Remember your bar should be to become the best you can be. Be defined by your the bars you overcome and not by comparing yourself to the bars other people overcome.

https://app.amstatz.com/p/business/garywondrash